/tagged/Earth/page/2
dskiff:

Nile, Egypt, Israel, Arabian Peninsula, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey. Sunrise in the east.

dskiff:

Nile, Egypt, Israel, Arabian Peninsula, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey. Sunrise in the east.

(via alscientist)

kottke.org: Space is closer than you might think

jtotheizzoe:

jkottke:

Space always seems so far away and much of it actually is. But space is actually quite close to where we are all sitting right now. The Kármán line, the commonly accepted boundary between the Earth’s atmosphere and space, is only 62 miles above sea level.

The line was named after Theodore von Kármán, (1881-1963) a Hungarian-American engineer and physicist who was active primarily in the fields of aeronautics and astronautics. He first calculated that around this altitude the Earth’s atmosphere becomes too thin for aeronautical purposes (because any vehicle at this altitude would have to travel faster than orbital velocity in order to derive sufficient aerodynamic lift from the atmosphere to support itself). Also, there is an abrupt increase in atmospheric temperature and interaction with solar radiation.

A distance of 62 miles can covered by a car on the interstate in less than an hour. Stable Earth orbits are achievable at only 100 miles above the Earth, with the ISS and Space Shuttles usually orbiting at a height of ~200 miles. To show how small a distance that really is, I made the following image…the orange line in the upper left represents 200 miles away from the surface.

Pretty crazy.

It took thousands of years of human ingenuity to make it 62 miles above sea level, even for a few minutes. In the half century since then, we’ve turned our orbital shell into a virtual electronic junkyard, and have space probes about to leave the solar system.

How high above Earth will the next 50 years take us?

smithsonianmag:

The Highest Resolution Image of Earth Ever

This composite image uses a number of swaths of the Earth’s surface taken on January 4, 2012.

Photo courtesy of NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring
Ed note: Perfect for your desktop background. Click the photo for the 8000x8000 image
h/t Gizmodo

smithsonianmag:

The Highest Resolution Image of Earth Ever

This composite image uses a number of swaths of the Earth’s surface taken on January 4, 2012.

Photo courtesy of NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring

Ed note: Perfect for your desktop background. Click the photo for the 8000x8000 image

h/t Gizmodo

(via beneathatree-deactivated2013052)

jtotheizzoe:


Earth’s Cities at Night: Photos From Space
A gorgeous collection of images taken from space highlighting vibrant and active cities below.
Pictured Above: The city of Milan, Italy appears as a cluster of lights in this photograph, with brilliant white lights indicating the historic city center where the Duomo di Milano (Milan Cathedral) stands. The Expedition 26 crew aboard the International Space Station took this picture on February 22, 2011. —Tom Chao
Credit: ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center

Something about this looks like a bacterial growth, and something about that says something about us.

Frankly, I think we should allow growths to do a bit more of our city planning for us, but the profundity’s not lost on me here.

jtotheizzoe:

Earth’s Cities at Night: Photos From Space

A gorgeous collection of images taken from space highlighting vibrant and active cities below.

Pictured Above: The city of Milan, Italy appears as a cluster of lights in this photograph, with brilliant white lights indicating the historic city center where the Duomo di Milano (Milan Cathedral) stands. The Expedition 26 crew aboard the International Space Station took this picture on February 22, 2011. —Tom Chao

Credit: ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center

Something about this looks like a bacterial growth, and something about that says something about us.

Frankly, I think we should allow growths to do a bit more of our city planning for us, but the profundity’s not lost on me here.

(Source: afro-dominicano, via jtotheizzoe)

henrycooke:

(via Rena Oil Spill Scars May Last Decades | Stuff.co.nz)
Aw fuck.

Fuuuck.
The Rena spill happens to present a top example of underreporting—I wouldn’t even have heard about this incident were it not for Tumblr. Even the Times only mentioned it on its environmental blog. Fucksake, world. (On the other hand, I suppose I should note in the same breath that it presents a top example of the benefits of new school internet media. [It would be a lot better if it didn’t exist to present examples, though.])

henrycooke:

(via Rena Oil Spill Scars May Last Decades | Stuff.co.nz)

Aw fuck.

Fuuuck.

The Rena spill happens to present a top example of underreporting—I wouldn’t even have heard about this incident were it not for Tumblr. Even the Times only mentioned it on its environmental blog. Fucksake, world. (On the other hand, I suppose I should note in the same breath that it presents a top example of the benefits of new school internet media. [It would be a lot better if it didn’t exist to present examples, though.])

(via henerycook)

socialistexan:

jonathan-cunningham:

From Calamities of Nature by Tony Piro

Notice the straggler on there in there…
This country is so ridiculous. My friends wonder why I want to move to Canada…

Surprise!
Iceland just keeps looking cooler and cooler lately. And woah, Turkey.
I feel it’s necessary to state that wealth/the lack thereof is probably the cause of belief in evolution/disbelief, not the other way around, as wealth affords people more better education and more opportunity for it. But that’s just what makes America’s place on the chart so horrifying. It’s exemplary of how screwed up our priorities are.

socialistexan:

jonathan-cunningham:

From Calamities of Nature by Tony Piro

Notice the straggler on there in there…

This country is so ridiculous. My friends wonder why I want to move to Canada…

Surprise!

Iceland just keeps looking cooler and cooler lately. And woah, Turkey.

I feel it’s necessary to state that wealth/the lack thereof is probably the cause of belief in evolution/disbelief, not the other way around, as wealth affords people more better education and more opportunity for it. But that’s just what makes America’s place on the chart so horrifying. It’s exemplary of how screwed up our priorities are.

The original poster doesn’t link to a source or state where this is, but I had to reblog because, well, look at it!
I imagine it’s somewhere in Asia or South America. (Really narrows it down…)

The original poster doesn’t link to a source or state where this is, but I had to reblog because, well, look at it!

I imagine it’s somewhere in Asia or South America. (Really narrows it down…)

(via moxie-nation)

The World of Seven Billion

A map and infographics on our Anthropocene era planet.

dskiff:

Nile, Egypt, Israel, Arabian Peninsula, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey. Sunrise in the east.

dskiff:

Nile, Egypt, Israel, Arabian Peninsula, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey. Sunrise in the east.

(via alscientist)

kottke.org: Space is closer than you might think

jtotheizzoe:

jkottke:

Space always seems so far away and much of it actually is. But space is actually quite close to where we are all sitting right now. The Kármán line, the commonly accepted boundary between the Earth’s atmosphere and space, is only 62 miles above sea level.

The line was named after Theodore von Kármán, (1881-1963) a Hungarian-American engineer and physicist who was active primarily in the fields of aeronautics and astronautics. He first calculated that around this altitude the Earth’s atmosphere becomes too thin for aeronautical purposes (because any vehicle at this altitude would have to travel faster than orbital velocity in order to derive sufficient aerodynamic lift from the atmosphere to support itself). Also, there is an abrupt increase in atmospheric temperature and interaction with solar radiation.

A distance of 62 miles can covered by a car on the interstate in less than an hour. Stable Earth orbits are achievable at only 100 miles above the Earth, with the ISS and Space Shuttles usually orbiting at a height of ~200 miles. To show how small a distance that really is, I made the following image…the orange line in the upper left represents 200 miles away from the surface.

Pretty crazy.

It took thousands of years of human ingenuity to make it 62 miles above sea level, even for a few minutes. In the half century since then, we’ve turned our orbital shell into a virtual electronic junkyard, and have space probes about to leave the solar system.

How high above Earth will the next 50 years take us?

smithsonianmag:

The Highest Resolution Image of Earth Ever

This composite image uses a number of swaths of the Earth’s surface taken on January 4, 2012.

Photo courtesy of NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring
Ed note: Perfect for your desktop background. Click the photo for the 8000x8000 image
h/t Gizmodo

smithsonianmag:

The Highest Resolution Image of Earth Ever

This composite image uses a number of swaths of the Earth’s surface taken on January 4, 2012.

Photo courtesy of NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring

Ed note: Perfect for your desktop background. Click the photo for the 8000x8000 image

h/t Gizmodo

(via beneathatree-deactivated2013052)

jtotheizzoe:


Earth’s Cities at Night: Photos From Space
A gorgeous collection of images taken from space highlighting vibrant and active cities below.
Pictured Above: The city of Milan, Italy appears as a cluster of lights in this photograph, with brilliant white lights indicating the historic city center where the Duomo di Milano (Milan Cathedral) stands. The Expedition 26 crew aboard the International Space Station took this picture on February 22, 2011. —Tom Chao
Credit: ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center

Something about this looks like a bacterial growth, and something about that says something about us.

Frankly, I think we should allow growths to do a bit more of our city planning for us, but the profundity’s not lost on me here.

jtotheizzoe:

Earth’s Cities at Night: Photos From Space

A gorgeous collection of images taken from space highlighting vibrant and active cities below.

Pictured Above: The city of Milan, Italy appears as a cluster of lights in this photograph, with brilliant white lights indicating the historic city center where the Duomo di Milano (Milan Cathedral) stands. The Expedition 26 crew aboard the International Space Station took this picture on February 22, 2011. —Tom Chao

Credit: ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center

Something about this looks like a bacterial growth, and something about that says something about us.

Frankly, I think we should allow growths to do a bit more of our city planning for us, but the profundity’s not lost on me here.

(Source: afro-dominicano, via jtotheizzoe)

henrycooke:

(via Rena Oil Spill Scars May Last Decades | Stuff.co.nz)
Aw fuck.

Fuuuck.
The Rena spill happens to present a top example of underreporting—I wouldn’t even have heard about this incident were it not for Tumblr. Even the Times only mentioned it on its environmental blog. Fucksake, world. (On the other hand, I suppose I should note in the same breath that it presents a top example of the benefits of new school internet media. [It would be a lot better if it didn’t exist to present examples, though.])

henrycooke:

(via Rena Oil Spill Scars May Last Decades | Stuff.co.nz)

Aw fuck.

Fuuuck.

The Rena spill happens to present a top example of underreporting—I wouldn’t even have heard about this incident were it not for Tumblr. Even the Times only mentioned it on its environmental blog. Fucksake, world. (On the other hand, I suppose I should note in the same breath that it presents a top example of the benefits of new school internet media. [It would be a lot better if it didn’t exist to present examples, though.])

(via henerycook)

(Source: shaynakin, via therecipe)

socialistexan:

jonathan-cunningham:

From Calamities of Nature by Tony Piro

Notice the straggler on there in there…
This country is so ridiculous. My friends wonder why I want to move to Canada…

Surprise!
Iceland just keeps looking cooler and cooler lately. And woah, Turkey.
I feel it’s necessary to state that wealth/the lack thereof is probably the cause of belief in evolution/disbelief, not the other way around, as wealth affords people more better education and more opportunity for it. But that’s just what makes America’s place on the chart so horrifying. It’s exemplary of how screwed up our priorities are.

socialistexan:

jonathan-cunningham:

From Calamities of Nature by Tony Piro

Notice the straggler on there in there…

This country is so ridiculous. My friends wonder why I want to move to Canada…

Surprise!

Iceland just keeps looking cooler and cooler lately. And woah, Turkey.

I feel it’s necessary to state that wealth/the lack thereof is probably the cause of belief in evolution/disbelief, not the other way around, as wealth affords people more better education and more opportunity for it. But that’s just what makes America’s place on the chart so horrifying. It’s exemplary of how screwed up our priorities are.

The original poster doesn’t link to a source or state where this is, but I had to reblog because, well, look at it!
I imagine it’s somewhere in Asia or South America. (Really narrows it down…)

The original poster doesn’t link to a source or state where this is, but I had to reblog because, well, look at it!

I imagine it’s somewhere in Asia or South America. (Really narrows it down…)

(via moxie-nation)

The World of Seven Billion

A map and infographics on our Anthropocene era planet.

About:

A travel blog of news, tips, interviews and lots of wishful thinking, maintained by someone currently anchored in studenthood.

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